Noel in the News

‘Seismic shift’: New law will reduce number of juveniles sent to adult court in Washington state

The Seattle Times

  APRIL

Robbing a convenience store at gunpoint or spraying bullets from a moving vehicle are the kinds of crimes that will no longer see 16- and 17-year-olds automatically sent to adult court — and likely, on to adult prison.

Gov. Jay Inslee recently signed legislation that represents what one lawmaker called “a seismic shift” in the state’s efforts to reform the juvenile-justice system. The new law removes a handful of crimes from the list of what are known as auto-decline offenses and extends juvenile jurisdiction for those specific crimes to age 25. Read more…

Rep. Frame squares off against AWB on B&O tax cuts

Washington State Wire

  

'Protect kids, not guns': Seattle students walk out

Seattle PI

High spirits of hundreds of Ingraham and Lakeside high school students, gathering on a soggy Seattle soccer field, were hushed by an impressive moment of silence for the 13 students and four staff massacred on Valentine’s Day at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Read more…

Senate Passes Legislation To Expand Open Educational Resources

Seattle Medium

Change law that criminalizes teen sexting

The Seattle Times

  FEBRUARY 8

Teenagers should not be labeled as sex offenders simply for texting intimate pictures of themselves to someone else. But that is exactly what can happen right now in Washington state. The state’s child pornography laws make no distinction between teens who send pictures of their own bodies and adults who take explicit images of children to exploit them.
A smart proposal in the Legislature would change this backward reality. Senate Bill 6566 would ensure that teens who send explicit images of themselves online or by text message — sexting — are not treated the same as adults who distribute child pornography. Read more…

The Democrat-Controlled State House Just Passed a Bill that Could Cost $2 Billion in Light Rail Funding

The Stranger

  JANUARY 24

The Washington State House of Representatives voted 60-37 today to change the way the state collects car tab taxes. The bill is meant to address an ongoing fight over a formula that inflates the value of more expensive cars. But because those car tab fees help fund light rail, transit advocates are opposed. Read more…

Big wins for kids caught in foster care crisis

Crosscut

  JULY 10

Children and families caught in the state’s beleaguered child welfare system have significant good news to celebrate this week as the state, with millions of extra dollars just appropriated by legislators, launches a major restructuring of the system.

Lawmakers this year passed a half-dozen new laws and millions in funding to reform child welfare programs, support foster parents better, lower social worker caseloads, and help foster youth get drivers licenses and access to lawyers, among other efforts. Read more…

Voices from Seattle's Tax March

The Stranger

  APRIL 15

A few thousand people rallied outside of the Henry M. Jackson federal building on an arguably sunny Saturday morning for Tax March Seattle, a movement calling for Donald Trump to release his tax returns and for the U.S. to adopt fairer tax policies.

The march to the Seattle Center didn’t compare at all in number to the Seattle Womxn’s March back in January, but that’s not such a big surprise. For one, the desire to see a president’s tax returns doesn’t exactly stir up the same revolutionary fervor that a civil rights protest might. Read more…

Boeing got a record tax break from Washington state and cut jobs anyway. Now the state wants to strike back

Chicago Tribune

  MAY 4, 2017

A few years ago, Washington state awarded the Boeing Co. the largest corporate tax break any state had given any corporation — a massive $8.7-billion handout aimed at encouraging the aerospace industry generally, and Boeing specifically, “to maintain and grow its workforce within the state.

Unwisely, state legislators and Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee didn’t make that a hard and fast requirement of the handout. So they’ve had to stand by powerlessly as the company has cut 12,655 jobs, or more than 15% of its Washington workforce, since that heady signing ceremony in November 2013. Layoff notices have gone out to 429 more employees in just the last few weeks. Read more…

Bills link Boeing tax breaks to size of its workforce in Washington

The Seattle Times

  MAY 2, 2017

OLYMPIA — Frustrated by the loss of thousands of Boeing jobs in recent years, lawmakers are weighing two measures that would tie Boeing’s eligibility for tax breaks to the number of people the company employs in Washington.

The House Finance Committee heard public testimony on the measures Tuesday. The bills are a tweaked version of bills introduced in previous years that never gained traction in the Democratic-controlled House, but have received renewed interest after another round of Boeing layoffs was announced last month. Read more…

Joy and pain in Washington delegation as Hillary makes history

KUOW

  JULY 27

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night when she became the first woman nominated for president by a major party.

The moment drew mixed emotions from Washington state delegates. Many were ecstatic. Hillary delegate Pam Eakes danced on the floor and yelled, “This is it.” In a gesture of unity, Sen. Bernie Sanders came to the convention floor at the end of the roll call vote and called for Clinton to be nominated by acclamation. Read more…